Sneaky look inside of London's architectural gems | The Perfect Man

Sneaky look inside of London’s architectural gems

There are many picturesque buildings in London. We pass them every day on our way to work during rush hour without ever questioning what’s hidden behind their doors. Well we’ve decided we want to have a nose around some of London’s architectural gems and have a peek at what’s inside…

Severndroog Castle

Severndroog Castle
Severndroog Castle

Located in South-East London, Severndroog Castle was built by a grieving widow on Shooters Hill. The widow was Anne, Lady James, whose husband Sir William died in 1783, and the castle commemorates her love for her husband and his greatest adventure: destroying a band of pirates in 1755 in their fortress – Severn Droog – off the west coast of Malabar.

It’s an 18th-century Gothic tower, designed by architect Richard Jupp, who opted for an unusual triangular shape, with an impressive viewing platform.

Severndroog Castle
Severndroog Castle

These days the castle is both Grade II* listed and on English Heritage’s Buildings at Risk register. It’s mainly used as a wedding venue but they do open their doors to visitors but we do suggest looking up their visiting times to avoid disappointment.

Severndroog Castle
Severndroog Castle

Like many other Gothic structures, Severndroog Castle does not disappoint when it comes to the creepy factor, especially on a dark and gloomy day but that’s exactly what we love about it – we think that the spooky vibe just ads to its charm.

Where:

Brixton Windmill

Brixton Windmill
Brixton Windmill

Originally built in 1816, Brixton Windmill was originally used to produce stone ground wholewheat white flower, at which point it became known as Ashby’s Windmill – named after it’s owners, the Ashby family.

To cut a long story short, the windmill was renovated several times over the years, but in 2002 it was placed on the English Heritage’s Buildings at Risk register and in 2010 it was awarded funds for renovation.
Brixton Windmill
Brixton Windmill

This year, Brixton Windmill celebrates its 200th Birthday and you can pop in for a tour of it’s preserved interior to have a look at its inner workings and get a sense of what it was like 200 years ago when it first opened for business.

Brixton Windmill
Brixton Windmill

Where: Windmill Gardens, West end of Blenheim Gardens, London, SW2 5EU

Soho Square Cottage

Soho Square Cottage
Soho Square Cottage

Built in the 1670’s, Soho Square was one of the most fashionable places to live in London. It was originally known as King’s Square, named after King Charles II, who had a statue of himself placed in the center of the Square in 1681. In the 19th century however, the statue was described as being ‘in a most wretched mutilated state; and the inscriptions on the base of the pedestal quite illegible’. So in a plan to restore the square, in 1875, it was removed and later restored and returned in 1938.

A few meters behind the statue sits the Soho Square Gardener’s hut. There are many conspiracies behind how the building came about and what it has been used for over the years, with some legends spreading that it’s the entrance to a secret tunnel that links to Buckingham palace, or more likely the entrance to the Soho Square Bomb shelter.

Soho Square Bomb Shelter
Soho Square Bomb Shelter
Today, the Elizabethan style cottage like structure is a Grade II listed building, used as a gardening shed to keep all of the lawn mowers and tools to upkeep Soho Square itself.
There are no actual images to be found of what the inside of the shed actually looks like, which makes us wonder even more, and unfortunately the windows are far too high to peep in, so we think this will be a mystery yet to be solved.
Where: Soho Square, London